Momentan auf dem
Portal vorhanden:

1
0
1
1
Videos


1
2
8
9
Audios

 

 

Uni-Logo
Sektionen
Sie sind hier: Startseite Recht Reden und Vorträge Freiburger Vorträge zur …
Artikelaktionen

Freiburger Vorträge zur Staatswissenschaft und Rechtsphilosophie

Informationen

Freiburger Vorträge zur Staatswissenschaft und Rechtsphilosophie

Freiburger Vorträge zur Staatswissenschaft und Rechtsphilosophie. Veranstalter: Rechtswissenschaftliche Fakultät der Universität Freiburg

Weiterführender Link:

Video

Abonnieren per RSS | iTunesU
  1. Powers and Competences

    Prof. Jaap Hage, Faculty of Law, University of Maastricht

    Vortrag gehalten am 10.12.2015

    Zur Person:

    Jaap Hage studierte Rechtswissenschaften und Philosophie an der Universität Leiden. Nachdem er für eine kurze Zeit auf dem Gebiet der Informatik forschte, lehrt und arbeitet er seit 1978 als Professor für Allgemeine Rechtslehre zunächst an der Universität Leiden und heute an der Universität Maastricht. Zu seinen bisherigen Veröffentlichungen gehören die Werke „Feiten en betekenis“ (Dissertation zur Praktischen Vernunft), „Reasoning with Rules“, und „Studies in Legal Logic“.


    Abstract:

    In the jurisprudential literature, the notions of legal power and legal competence are usually not well distinguished. The present article tries to develop such a clear distinction.
    The existence of a legal power is described as a side-effect of legal rules that make it possible to bring about particular results. For example, Charlène has the legal power to reduce her tax obligations by moving from Belgium to Monaco. (The example is on purpose not of a juridical act.) Legal powers can be the side-effect of the existence of counts-as, fact-to-fact, and dynamic rules.
    A legal capacity is described as a status, attributed by a legal rule, which is a necessary prerequisite for bringing about legal consequences by means of a juridical act. For example, Parliament has the competence to create statutes. Without this competence an attempt to make a statute would be invalid.
    The concept of a legal competence is in first instance an internal legal concept, meaning that it is a concept used in legal rules. In this respect it differs from the concept of a legal power, which is not used in legal rules, even though legal powers exist because of legal rules. The concept of a legal power is an external legal concept.
    If a legal power is to be exercised by means of a juridical act, but only then, the competence to do so is a necessary condition for the existence of this power.


  2. The Structure of Arguments by Analogy in Law

    Prof. Claudio Michelon, Professor of Philosophy of Law, Edinburgh Law School, University of Edinburgh

    Vortrag gehalten am 19.11.2015

    Zur Person:

    An der Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brasilien) absolvierte Prof. Claudio Michelon das Studium der Philosophie, das er 1992 mit einem LL.B und
    1996 mit dem Master in Philosophie abschloss. 2001 promovierte er an der University of Edinburgh. Von 2001 bis 2006 lebte Prof. Michelon in Brasilien, wo er als Rechtsanwalt praktizierte und Assistant Professor an der Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul war. Seit 2007 ist er Professor für Rechtsphilosophie an der University of Edinburgh.

    Abstract:

    The Structure of Arguments by Analogy in Law

    This paper discusses the structure of arguments by analogy in law. The first part of the paper takes issue with the best known (contemporary account of the structure of legal analogical argument: Martin P. Golding’s. Golding’s account gives expression to a very popular picture of analogical arguments. For him, arguments by analogy fit the following scheme:

    (1) x has characteristics F, G . . . (2) y has characteristics F, G . . . (3) x has characteristic H.
    (4) F, G . . . are H-relevant characteristics. Therefore (from (1), (2), (3), and (4)),
    (5)Unless there are countervailing considerations, y has characteristic H.

    This paper presents two objections to conceiving analogical argument in these terms: (a) the source case is argumentatively idle and (b) the argument fails to account for the normative nature of the conclusion of legal analogies.
    The second part of the paper presents and defends an alternative account of the structure of arguments by analogy in law. There are (at least) three advantages of the proposed characterisation.
    First, the scheme discharges the two burdens identified in the discussion of Golding’s scheme: it accounts for the normative character of analogical arguments in law, and retains the argumentative relevance of the source case. Second, the theoretical framework that informs the scheme allows for an integrated understanding of how precedent works in legal argument. Third, the scheme and the theoretical framework also enable one to make sense of some popular claims about judicial reasoning. One example is the idea law might in some instances develop on the back of reasoning “from case to case” without the necessary articulation (at any given step) of any general unifying rules.


  3. Normativer Monismus

    Dr. Christoph Kletzer

    Vortrag gehalten am 13.05.2015
    Dr. Christoph Kletzer ist Senior Lecturer in Law, King's College London


  4. Weimarer Staatsrechtslehrer unter dem Grundgesetz

    Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Michael Stolleis

    Vortrag gehalten am 11.02.2015
    Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Michael Stolleis ist Professor für Öffentliches Recht und Neuere Rechtsgeschichte an der Goethe-Universität zu Frankfurt a.M. und ehem. Direktor am Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte zu Frankfurt a.M


  5. Psychology, Morality, and (Public) Law: The Role of Loss Aversion

    Prof. Dr. Eyal Zamir (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel)

    Vortrag gehalten am 2. Juli 2014

    Zur Person:
    Eyal Zamir ist Professor für Wirtschaftsrecht an der Hebräischen Universität Jerusalem und Direktor der Aharon-Barak-Forschungsstelle für Interdisziplinäre Rechtsstudien. Er erlangte einen Bachelor in Rechtswissenschaften (LL.B.) an der Hebräischen Universität Jerusalem, wo er zudem in Rechtswissenschaften promovierte und sich habilitierte.
    Eyal Zamir war Gastprofessor an den Universitäten Harvard, Yale, NYU, Georgetown, UCLA, Zürich und am Max-Planck-Institut für Ökonomik in Jena. Des Weiteren gab er dreizehn Werke heraus (drei von diesen mit der Oxford University Press) und veröffentlichte zahlreiche Artikel in israelischen und amerikanischen rechtswissenschaftlichen Fachzeitschriften (u.a. „Columbia Law Review“, „Journal of Legal Studies“, „California Law Review“, „Virginia Law Review“ und „American Journal of International Law“).

    Abstract:
    Why are civil and political rights accorded much greater constitutional protection than social and economic rights? Why do constitutions limit the state’s power to take private property but hardly limit its power to confer property to private entities, or require them to charge recipients for such benefits? What might explain the fact that affirmative action plans refer to benefits that people do not yet have, such as getting a job, but rarely, if ever, dictate that an employee who already occupies a certain position should vacate it for someone else? How come immigration and refugee law (and even more so—immigration and refugee practice) treat refugees and asylum seekers who have already entered a state’s territory—lawfully or not—rather differently than those who seek entry?
    While not trying to give a comprehensive answer to these questions, I will argue that there is a common denominator to these and other puzzles (including ones that arise in private law, such as the centrality of tort law versus the relative marginality of unjust enrichment law): they are all best answered on the basis of loss aversion. Psychological studies have established that people do not perceive outcomes as final states of wealth or welfare. Rather, they perceive them as gains and losses, and losses ordinarily loom larger than gains. Loss aversion is thus related to fundamental legal issues.
    I will also strive to explain the compatibility between loss aversion and the law. According to an evolutionary theory, since losses are more painful than unattained gains, people file lawsuits when they experience a loss much more often than when the fail to obtain a gain. Consequently, legal doctrines dealing with the former are much more developed. Another theory focuses on the mindset of legal policymakers. Legal thinking largely follows deontological morality. As such, it distinguishes between harming people and not aiding them. This theory highlights an important correspondence between psychology, morality, and law.
    Finally, I will touch upon the normative implications of loss aversion. Among other things, I will argue that, ceteris paribus, the law should favor not-giving over taking. Lawmakers should also consider the framing effect of legal norms and the impact of loss aversion on policymaking.


  6. Überlegungen zur idealen Dimension des Recht und zur Rechtsphilosophie von John Finnis

    Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Robert Alexy (Kiel)

    Vortrag gehalten am 28. November 2013

    Abstract:

    In der jüngeren Diskussion über das Verhältnis von Recht und Moral ist sowohl auf der positivistischen Seite, etwa von Joseph Raz, als auch auf der nichtpositivistischen Seite, etwa von John Finnis, die These vertreten worden, dass die klassische Frage, ob notwendige Verbindungen zwischen Recht und Moral existieren, die falsche Frage sei, um den Streit zwischen Positivismus und Nichtpositivismus zu entscheiden. Der Vortrag stellt dem die These gegenüber, dass die Frage nach notwendigen Verbindungen zwischen Recht und Moral notwendig ist, um jenen Streit einer Lösung näher zu führen. Das kann als „Notwendigkeitsthese“ bezeichnet werden. Die Basis der Notwendigkeitsthese ist eine weitere These, die Doppelnaturthese, welche sagt, dass das Recht notwendig sowohl eine reale oder faktische Dimension hat als auch eine ideale oder kritische. Das alles wird vor dem Hintergrund der Rechtsphilosophie von John Finnis erörtert.


  7. Die Verfassung als normative Rahmenordnung. Eine deutsch-französische Perspektive

    Prof. Dr. Armel Le Divellec (Universität Paris2, Panthéon-Assas)

    Vortrag gehalten am 11.06.2013

    Abstract:
    Haben Juristen einen akzeptablen Verfassungsbegriff? Wie viele Grundbegriffe des Rechtslebens und -denkens bleibt die Verfassung eine schwer erfassbare Kategorie. Trotz erheblicher Anstrengung der Staatsrechtslehre, insbesondere in Deutschland, scheint die Suche nach einem angemessenen Begriff der (liberal-demokratischen) Verfassung unbefriedigend. Gewiss, jede Theorie der Verfassung hängt von eigenen erkenntnistheoretischen Vorfragen ab. Und die Mannigfaltigkeit der möglichen Grundsatzpositionen bringt eine Fülle von verschiedenen Verfassungsbegriffen mit sich.

    Dennoch lohnt es sich vielleicht, von einem möglichst ,,undogmatischen" Standpunkt ausgehend, den Versuch erneut zu unternehmen, einen Verfassungsbegriff vorzuschlagen, der in Anlehnung an die, zugleich aber auch in Modifizierung der von Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde geprägten Formel die Verfassung als normative Rahmenordnung versteht. Dieser Versuch wird im Dialog mit Autoren unterschiedlicher Rechtskulturen, insbesondere solchen französischer und deutscher Provenienz, unternommen.


  8. Hate Speech and Self-Restraint

    Prof. Dr. Arthur Jacobson (Cardozo Law School)

    Vortrag gehalten am: 05.06.2013

    Zur Person:
    Arthur J. Jacobson ist Professor an der Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law der Yeshiva University in New York. Er studierte Jura und Politikwissenschaften in Harvard, wo er 1978 mit einer Arbeit zur politischen Philosophie Hegels promoviert wurde. Noch während seines Studiums wurde er 1977 Assistenzprofessor und schließlich 1981 ordentlicher Professor an der Cardozo School of Law. Seine Forschungsinteressen erstrecken sich zum einen auf Materien des modernen amerikanischen Rechts, besonders des Vertragsrechts, Arbeitsrechts, Antidiskriminierungsrechts und Anwaltsrechts, und zum anderen auf die Rechtsphilosophie (Plato, Spinoza, Hegel, Derrida, Luhmann, Habermas) und das Verfassungsrecht (Demokratie, Weimarer Republik).


    Abstract:
    "Hate Speech and Self-Restraint" demolishes a truism of comparative constitutional law. The truism is that the United States is the only constitutional democracy not to regulate hate speech. True, it does not criminalize hate speech as such. But the institutions of civil society in the United States patrol hate speech with far greater ferocity and effect than any prosecutor pursuing crimes. The talk will lay out and examine the three institutions and propose a characteristically "American" model of self-restraint in civil society as opposed to restraint by the state. The good baron, M. de Tocqueville, would be pleased that what he described over 170 years ago remains true to this day.


  9. Incommensurability, Proportionality and Defeasibility

    Prof. Dr. Chapman (University of Toronto)

    Vortrag gehalten am 17.04.2013

    Zur Person:
    Bruce Chapman ist Professor an der Rechtswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Universität Toronto und ehemaliger Herausgeber des University of Toronto Law Journals. Er verfügt über einen Doktortitel in Wirtschaftswissenschaften der Universität Cambridge und war unter anderem Assistenzprofessor am Department of Philosophy der University of Western Ontario sowie Gastdozent auf fast allen Kontinenten, etwa in Oxford, Singapur, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgien), Buenos Aires und Canberra. Hauptgebiete seiner zahlreichen Veröffentlichungen sind neben Rechtstheorie und Deliktsrecht insbesondere auch die wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Analyse des Rechts sowie die Entscheidungstheorie. Er erhielt wiederholt Forschungsstipendien für seine Arbeiten im Bereich der rationalen Entscheidungsfindung. Ein wichtiges Werk aus jüngerer Zeit ist der Aufsatz „Defeasible Rules and Interpersonal Accountability“ (erschienen in J. Ferrer und G. B. Ratti (Hrsg.), Essays in Legal Defeasibility, Oxford University Press 2011).

    Abstract:
    At least in some cases, the values confronted in legal decision-making appear to be incommensurable. Some legal theorists resist incommensurability because they fear that this presents an overwhelming obstacle to rational decision-making. By offering a close analysis of proportionality and, more particularly, measures of proportional value satisfaction, I show that this fear is unfounded. Comparative measures of proportional value satisfaction do not require the values to be commensurable. However, assuming incommensurability presents us with the problem of public significance in the proportional satisfaction of values. When two values are commensurable, this public significance is provided by the mediating effects of the overarching third value that provides the common measure of the values. However, when this common measure is removed, then the public significance of value satisfaction must be otherwise achieved. This is why I propose an equal proportional value satisfaction as the most appropriate proportionality maximand. Under equal proportional value satisfaction, the proportional satisfaction of any one value has significance for each and every other value. This kind of public significance is interpersonal rather than impersonal (or second-personal rather than third-personal). The paper then shows that the legal process that is most appropriate to equal proportionality is a process that implements defeasible legal rules.


  10. Die politische Rolle der Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit

    Prof. Dr. Oliver Lepsius (Universität Bayreuth)

    Vortrag gehalten am 22. 12. 2012

    Abstract:

    Fast alle politischen Fragen lassen sich verfassungsrechtlich zu Rechtsfragen umformulieren - wenn das Bundesverfassungsgericht dies will. Ist das Bundesverfassungsgericht als Verfassungsorgan also ein politischer Akteur? Und wenn ja: Darf es das sein und was folgt daraus für seine Aufgaben, Kompetenzen und Grenzen? Das BVerfG hat immer schon über politische Grundsatzfragen entschieden (Abtreibung, Grundlagenvertrag mit der DDR, europäische Integration und vieles mehr). Es liegt in der Natur der Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit, Rechtsfragen zu entscheiden, die zugleich politische Richtungsentscheidungen betreffen und den Mehrheitswillen in der Demokratie begrenzen. Wenn der Eindruck nicht täuscht, nehmen solche Verfahren eher zu. Liegt das an der Dysfunktionalität des politischen Systems? Liegt es an einer Selbstermächtigung in Karlsruhe? Wie sollte sich das Gericht in der Zwickmühle von Verfassungsbindung und Primat der Politik institutionell verhalten? Unter welchen Bedingungen gibt es eine Berechtigung zu politischen Entscheidungen der Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit?
    Mit diesen Fragen setzt sich der Vortrag auseinander und versucht, eine Perspektive für die deutsche Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit im 21. Jahrhundert zu formulieren.


  11. Der Stufenbau der Rechtsordnung - Zur Belastbarkeit eines Konzepts

    Prof. Dr. Ewald Wiederin (Universität Wien)

    Vortrag gehalten am 12.06.2012

    Abstract:
    Die Lehre vom Stufenbau der Rechtsordnung zählt zu den echten Innovationen, die der Rechtstheorie im 20. Jahrhundert gelungen sind. Sie hat die Gesetzesfixierung der Rechtswissenschaft aufgebrochen und eine pluralistische Rechtsquellentheorie entwickelt, in der neben Verordnungen auch Urteile und Verwaltungsakte ihren Platz haben; sie hat die Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit theoretisch legitimiert und ein einheitliches rechtliches Weltbild postuliert, in das auch das Völkerrecht integriert werden kann; sie hat den unpolitischen, rein nach rechtlichen Maßstäben urteilenden Richter entmythifiziert und seine politische Rolle freigelegt.
    So weitreichend ihre Implikationen und so suggestiv ihre Bilder sind, so wenig ausgearbeitet ist die Stufenbautheorie im Kern. Zwar wird zwischen einem Stufenbau nach der rechtlichen Bedingtheit und einem Stufenbau nach der derogatorischen Kraft unterschieden; hier wie dort bleibt jedoch im Vagen, wie das die Stufungen generierende Kriterium zu definieren ist. Der Vortrag spürt den verschiedenen Konzeptionen rechtlicher Bedingtheit sowie derogatorischer Kraft nach. Er plädiert dafür, die Vorstellung eines Stufenbaus nach der rechtlichen Bedingtheit zu verabschieden, an der derogatorischen Kraft als ordnungsstiftendem Element jedoch festzuhalten und die Stufenbaulehre als theoretischen Rahmen zu konzipieren, der differenzierte Rechtswidrigkeiten sowie rechtswidriges Recht zu beschreiben und die damit einhergehenden dogmatischen Probleme adäquat zu behandeln erlaubt.


  12. Law and Neuroscience

    Prof. Dr. Dennis Patterson (European University Institute Florenz)

    Vortrag gehalten am 24.05.2012

    Zur Person:
    Dennis Patterson hat seit September 2009 den Lehrstuhl für Rechtstheorie und Rechtsphilosophie am European University Institute in Florenz inne. Darüber hinaus ist er Professor für Rechtsphilosophie und Internationales Handelsrecht an der Swansea University in Wales sowie Board of Governors Professor an der Rutgers Law School, New Jersey, wo er seit 1990 lehrt. Er erhielt Senior Research Grants unter anderem von der Fulbright-Kommission, der Humboldt-Stiftung und dem American Council of Learned Societies. Dennis Patterson war Gastprofessor an zahlreichen Universitäten, etwa in Berlin, Wien, London und Sydney, und hat zahlreiche Bücher und Artikel zu Rechtsphilosophie, Wirtschaftsrecht und Handelsrecht veröffentlicht. Zu nennen sind hier insbesondere die zusammen mit Ari Afilalo verfasste Monographie The New Global Trading Order: The Evolving State and the Future of Trade sowie das in mehrere Sprachen, darunter Deutsch, übersetzte Werk Law and Truth. Zur Zeit arbeitet er an Monographien über allgemeine Rechtslehre und die Grundlagen internationalen Rechts sowie an einer Serie von Artikeln zum Verhältnis von Recht und Neurowissenschaften.

    Abstract:
    Neuroscientific evidence continues to make its way into legal proceedings around the world. Despite its increasing importance, especially in criminal proceedings, there is far from universal consensus on the scientific reliability of such evidence. This presentation will describe some of the current controversies surrounding the use of neuroscientific evidence in legal proceedings. Among the topics I shall discuss are: the reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques; the admissibility of neuroscientific evidence in US Courts; and some of the basic philosophical controversies about the relationship of mind to brain.


  13. Norm und Begründung: die paratopische Systemverschiebung

    Prof. Dr. Dr. Otto Pfersmann (Universität Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne)

    Vortrag gehalten am 12.01.2012

    Zur Person:
    Otto Pfersmann ist Professor für Rechtstheorie und Vergleichendes Verfassungsrecht an der Universität Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. Von 2000 bis 2002 war er Kodirektor des In-stitute of European and Comparative Law in Oxford. Er ist Gastprofessor an verschiede-nen Universitäten in Belgien, Italien, Israel, Norwegen, der Schweiz, Ungarn, den Vereinigten Staaten und Mitglied der Redaktion mehrerer Zeitschriften und des Direktoriums wissenschaftlicher Vereinigungen. Zu seinen jüngeren Publikationen zählen „Le sophis-me onomastique. A propos de l’interprétation de la constitution” (Paris 2005), „Dibattito sul interpretazione giuridica” (Neapel 2007), „The only constitution and it's many enemies” (Utrecht 2010) und „Explanation and Production: Two Ways of Using and Constructing Legal Argumentation” (Heidelberg 2010).

    Abstract:
    In der zeitgenössischen Rechtsentwicklung lassen sich folgende zwei Phänomene beobachten: 1) Höchstgerichte tendieren dazu, mittels verschiedener Techniken, Spruch und Begründung zusammenzufügen; 2) die Lehre stellt das Verfassungsrecht (Europarecht, Verwaltungsrecht, Privatrecht usf.) an Hand der von den Gerichten gelieferten Begründungen dar. Diese Entwicklung wird heute als natürlich betrachtet; sie ist im höchsten Maße problematisch – und zwar aus begrifflichen, logischen wie juristischen Überlegungen. Begrifflich gesehen, gehören Begründungen und Sprüche zwei völlig unterschiedlichen Aussageformen an. In logischer Hinsicht, besteht zwischen diesen Sätzen dieser unterschiedlichen Arten keinerlei deduktive Verknüpfung. In rechtlicher Hinsicht wäre eine solche Hypothese – wäre sie überhaupt möglich – einerseits eine Verletzung der Begründungspflicht, andererseits bestünde sie in der Einführung einer Normenkategorie ohne (Rechtssatz-)Form. Das Verfassungsrecht (Europarecht, Verwaltungsrecht, Privatrecht usf.) wäre solcherart zu einer Menge paratopischer Normen geworden.


  14. Legal Positivism and the Normativity of Law

    Prof. Torben Spaak (Uppsala Universität)

    Vortrag gehalten am 30.11.2011

    Zur Person:
    Torben Spaak ist Professor der Rechtswissenschaften an der Uppsala Universität. Er unterrichtete an der Minnesota Law School und war Gastprofessor in Buenos Aires, Genua und Minneapolis. Er ist Mitglied der schwedischen Sektion der Internationalen Vereinigung für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie. Sein Forschungs- und Interessenschwerpunkt liegt im Bereich der analytischen Rechtswissenschaft, wobei er sich besonders auch um die Erschließung des skandinavischen Rechtsrealismus verdient gemacht hat. Zu seinen Monographien zählen „The Concept of Legal Competence“ (1994) und „Guidance and Constraint. The Action-Guiding Capacity of Theories of Legal Reasoning” (2007). Daneben treten eine Vielzahl von Beiträgen zu Grundfragen der Rechtstheorie. Zur Zeit arbeitet er an einer Monographie zum Problem der Natur des Rechts.

    Abstract:
    In this presentation, I discuss the problem of the normativity of law conceived within the framework of legal positivism, that is, the problem of accounting within this framework for the sense, if any, in which law confers rights and duties, or, if you will, provides normative reasons for action.
    I begin by explaining how I understand the problem of the normativity of law. I suggest (i) that we think of the function of the legal ‘ought’ as that of connecting the consequence with the condition(s) in a legal norm, as Kelsen does, and of the relevant type of normative reason for action as external reasons in Bernard Williams’s sense. I then argue (ii) that there is only one sense of normativity, only one sense of ‘ought’, (iii) that we need to distinguish between different grades of normativity, at the very least between social and justified normativity (as Raz calls them), and (iv) that the relevant grade of normativity in this context is justified normativity.

    I then turn to a consideration of the main tenets of legal positivism, namely the social thesis, the separation thesis, the thesis of social efficacy, and add a few words about the semantic thesis. And I explain what it is about legal positivism – namely the separation thesis – that makes it so difficult to come up with a satisfactory solution to this problem. I add a few words here about the logical relation between the social thesis and the separation thesis.

    Having come thus far, I introduce the solution to the problem of law’s normativity proposed by Hans Kelsen, namely that legal positivists need to presuppose the basic norm, if and insofar as they wish to conceive of the legal materials as a system of valid, that is, binding, norms. I explain (i) that Kelsen operates with the idea of justified, not social, normativity, and emphasize (ii) that, on Kelsen’s analysis, the presupposition of the basic norm is conditional. I then maintain that a solution to the problem of legal normativity along the lines of Kelsen’s analysis is all that legal positivists can hope for, while acknowledging that this solution is widely thought to be no solution at all.

    The presentation concludes with a consideration of two recent attempts to account for the normativity of law made by Scott Shapiro and Andrei Marmor, respectively. Whereas Shapiro maintains that law is first and foremost a social planning mechanism, and that a person who has legal authority has moral authority from the legal point of view, Marmor argues that the foundation of law is to be found in conventions of a certain type, namely constitutive conventions. I conclude, however, that neither author has been able to improve substantially on Kelsen’s analysis as regards the central question. On all three analyses, the upshot is that the normativity of law, conceived within the framework of legal positivism, can only be conditional upon the adoption of a certain, normative perspective or point of view. And this, I point out, is precisely what one should expect, given the centrality of the separation thesis in the positivistic framework.


  15. Coercion as/and the Concept of Law

    Prof. Frederick Schauer (University of Virginia)

    Vortrag gehalten am 08.06.2011

    Zur Person:
    Frederick Schauer ist David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law an der University of Virginia. Zuvor war er 18 Jahre als Professor of First Amendment an der John F. Kennedy School of Government der Havard University und als Professor of Law an der University of Michigan tätig. Er war außerdem Gründer und Co-Editor der Fachzeitschrift “Legal Theory”, Vize-Präsident der American Society of Political and Legal Philosophy und Vorsitzender des Commitee on Philosophy and Law. Zu seinen Werken zählen “The Law of Obscenity“ (1976), “Free Speech: A Philosophical Enquiry” (1982), “Playing By the Rules: A Philosophical Examination of Rule-Based Decision-Making in Law and Life” (1991), “Profiles, Probabilities and Stereotypes (2003), “Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New introduction to Legal Reasoning” (2009).

    Abstract:
    Until the publication of H.L.A. Hart’s The Concept of Law fifty years ago, it was widely accepted that a central feature of law was its coercive power. Unlike the norms and rules of games, morality, and etiquette, for example, the norms and rules of law were backed by the power of the state, legitimately, to punish those who violated them. Thus, the overwhelming view of legal theorists, including Bentham, Austin, and Kelsen, most prominently, was that coercion was a key component of law itself.

    In Hart’s attack on Austin, and thus on Bentham, Kelsen, and many others, he sought to show that law was about the union of primary and secondary rules, and about the internalization of the master secondary rule, the ultimate rule of recognition, by legal officials. Coercion played no part in the story, and for Hart and countless of his successors, especially in Anglophone analytic jurisprudence, coercion, because it is not strictly logically necessary for the existence of law on Hart’s account, could not be part of the concept of law.

    This project is an attempt to place coercion back in the center of legal philosophical thinking. Even if Hart is correct in imagining a possible legal system in a possible world in which coercion is not present, it is surely not irrelevant that all real legal systems employ coercion, and that coercion remains the principal characteristic distinguishing legal systems from other norms systems. To move from the prevalence of coercion to the claim that coercion remains the central feature of law itself, however, requires establishing, first, that the nature of law is better captured by its typical truths than by its logically necessary ones, and, second, that the conceptualization of a human artifact such as law is better understood as a cluster or family resemblance concept than through a set of individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions.


  16. Die Kultur des Denunziatorischen

    Prof. Dr. Bernhard Schlink (HU Berlin)

    Vortrag gehalten am 25.05.2011

    Zur Person:
    Bernhard Schlink studierte Jura in Heidelberg und Berlin, war als wissenschaftlicher Assistent in Darmstadt, Bielefeld und Freiburg tätig, wurde in Heidelberg mit einer Arbeit zur Abwägung im Verfassungsrecht promoviert und habilitierte sich in Freiburg mit einer Schrift zu Gewaltenteilung in der Verwaltung.

    Schlink war als Professor für Öffentliches Recht und Rechtsphilosophie an den Universitäten Bonn, Frankfurt und in Berlin tätig. Als Richter am Verfassungsgerichtshof des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen war er in Münster von 1987 bis 2006 beschäftigt. Darüber hinaus erlangte Schlink auch als Autor von preisgekrönten Romanen (u.a. „Der Vorleser“) internationalen Ruhm. Gegenwärtig beschäftigt er sich insbesondere mit der Verhältnismäßigkeit im Verfassungsvergleich.

    Abstract:

    Wozu waren und sind Juristen als Wissenschaftler wie als Praktiker moralisch verpflichtet? Nach welchen Kriterien sollen Historiker moralisch urteilen? Welche Berücksichtigung der damaligen Maßstäbe und Möglichkeiten schuldet ein heutiges moralisches Urteil über vergangenes Handeln?

    Bernhard Schlink beobachtet in der Rechts-, der Geschichts- und der Literaturwissenschaft einen Hang zur moralischen Bewertung, der denunziatorisch gerät. In seinem Vortrag unterzieht er die moralische Auseinandersetzung mit politischer, Rechts- und Literaturgeschichte einer kritischen Bestandsaufnahme. Anhand konkreter Beispiele zeigt er auf, wie Bewertungen von der Höhe heutiger Moral die in anderer Zeit und anderer Situation handelnden Menschen verfehlen. Er fragt, warum diese „Kultur des Denunziatorischen“ so dominant geworden ist und wohin sie führt.

    Hinweis: Der Vortrag beruht auf einem Aufsatz von Prof. Dr. Schlink, der unter demselben Titel in der Zeitschrift "Merkur" im Juni 2011 erschienen ist.


  17. Menschenwürde in Politik, Ethik und Recht

    Prof. Dr. Matthias Mahlmann (Universität Zürich)

    Vortrag gehalten am 11.05.2011

    Zur Person:
    Matthias Mahlmann studierte Rechtswissenschaften und Philosophie an den Universitäten Freiburg im Breisgau und Berlin sowie an der London School of Economics. Er promovierte 1999 zu „Rationalismus in der praktischen Theorie: Normentheorie und praktische Kompetenz“ und habilitierte sich 2005 mit der Arbeit „Elemente einer ethischen Grundrechtstheorie“. Seit dem Wintersemester 2005/2006 ist Professor Mahlmann Recurrent Visiting Professor an der Central European University in Budapest. 2007 wurde er Heisenberg-Stipendiat der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft. Seit dem Sommersemester 2008 ist Matthias Mahlmann Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Rechtstheorie, Rechtssoziologie und Internationales öffentliches Recht an der Universität Zürich. Der Schwerpunkt von Professor Mahlmanns wissenschaftlicher Arbeit liegt in der Rechtsphilosophie, der Theorie des Geistes, den Kognitionswissenschaften sowie in den Grundlagen von Ethik und Recht.

    Abstract:

    Menschenwürde ist ein Leitbegriff des modernen Rechts. Er fundiert Verfassungsordnungen und prägt die internationalen Systeme zum Schutz der Menschenrechte. Würde ist gleichzeitig ein zentraler Gegenstand der Reflexion der Ethik, nicht erst seit und nicht nur wegen ihrer Rolle in Kants Theorie der praktischen Vernunft. Die Würde der Menschen bildet nicht zuletzt auch ein Element entscheidender politischer Auseinandersetzungen und Kämpfe in der Geschichte und Gegenwart, um die Gestaltung von Lebensbedingungen, die Anteile der Einzelnen am Wohlstand einer Gesellschaft oder die Rechte von Menschen als mitbestimmende politische Subjekte der sozialen Ordnung.

    Was ist aber gemeint mit dem Begriff der Menschenwürde? Hat dieser Begriff überhaupt einen bestimmbaren Gehalt oder dient das laute Pathos seiner Verwendung nur dazu, seine ungreifbare Unbestimmtheit zu übertönen? Kann der Anspruch auf Universalität der Idee der Menschenwürde, der in der modernen Menschenrechtsarchitektur verkörpert liegt, eingelöst werden? Oder ist dieser Anspruch die täuschende Fassade vor der sich rechtlich, ethisch und politisch durchsetzenden kulturellen Relativität dessen, was Menschenwürde in
    konkreten Zusammenhängen tatsächlich bedeutet? Diese Fragen werden im internationalen Rahmen intensiv diskutiert. Das ist nicht verwunderlich, denn sie führen zu Problemen des normativen Fundaments modernen Rechts.


  18. The Judge in the Experts' Room

    Prof. Damiano Canale (Bocconi Universität Mailand)

    Vortrag gehalten am 19.01.2011

    Zur Person:
    Damiano Canale studierte Politikwissenschaften an der Universität Padua, Rechtswissenschaften an der Universität Würzburg und spezialisierte sich dann an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt auf Rechtstheorie. Seinen PhD in Rechtsphilosophie erhielt er an der Universität Padua. Als Gastwissenschaftler arbeitete er am Max-Plank-Institut für Europäische Rechtsgeschichte in Frankfurt am Main und an der Yale Law School in New Haven Conneticut, USA. An den Universitäten Padua und Rovigo war er außerdem als Gastprofessor tätig. Derzeit lehrt Professor Damiano Canale an der Bocconi Universität Mailand.

    Der Schwerpunkt von Damiano Canales wissenschaftlicher Arbeit liegt in der Theorie der Rechtsauslegung und Beweisführung, der Geschichte von Rechtsbegriffen, sowie der sozialwissenschaftlichen Methodologie und der Handlungstheorie.


    Abstract:
    In contemporary legal systems, policymaking and adjudication are more and more conditioned by scientific expertise that often determines the content of public policies and makes the difference between right and wrong. This is particularly apparent if we look at role of experts in adjudication, whose increasing weight is sometimes seen as a threat to the autonomy of law. However, legal theorists are not particularly sensitive to this phenomenon. The relevance of scientific expertise in law is normally restricted to the process of fact-finding, whereas the inclusion of technical, non-juridical contents in the legal regulation seems not to be an issue.

    In this paper I shall argue that the inclusion of non-juridical technicalities in the law can give rise to a serious problem of interpretation although their content is perfectly determined. I will label this problem "the opacity of law" and consider its characteristics, forms and conceptual implications.


  19. Das Ende der Reinen Rechtslehre?

    Prof. Dr. Stanley Paulson (Washington University / Universität zu Kiel)

    Vortrag gehalten am 15.12.2010

    Zur Person:
    Stanley L. Paulson wuchs in Minneapolis auf und studierte Philosophie an den Universitäten Minnesota (B.A.) und Wisconsin-Madison (M.A., Ph.D). Seinen law degree (J.D.) legte er an der Harvard University ab.
    Seit 1972 unterrichtet er am Department of Philosophy der Washington University in St. Louis. 1983 wurde er hier an die School of Law, und im Jahr 2000 zum William Gardiner Hammond Professor of Law berufen. Professor Paulson wurde 2004 die Ehrendoktorwürde von der Universität Uppsala in Schweden und der Universität zu Kiel verliehen. Neben Fellowships u.a. des National Endowment for the Humanities, der Fulbright Commision, der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft und der Rockefeller Foundation erhielt Paulson 2003 den Forschungspreis der Alexander von Humbolt-Stiftung. Gegenwärtig bekleidet Paulson die Mercator Gastprofessor an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel.
    Der Schwerpunkt seiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit liegt in der europäischen Rechtsphilosophie und –theorie. Eine Vielzahl seiner Beiträge befassen sich mit der Rechtsphilosophie und Verfassungstheorie von Hans Kelsen. Paulson verfasst seine Arbeiten auf Deutsch und Englisch. Eine Reihe von ihnen wurde mittlerweile in viele weitere Sprachen übersetzt.

    Abstract:
    Um 1960 herum hat Hans Kelsen (1881-1973) sein ganzes kantisches bzw. neukantianisches Instrumentarium, auf dem seine Reine Rechtslehre beruht, aufgegeben. Er schrieb Ulrich Klug in einem Brief vom 4. Juli 1960, er könne seine Lehre von der mittelbaren oder analogen Anwendung der Logik auf das Recht nicht mehr aufrechterhalten. Zwei Jahre später, auf einer Tagung in Salzburg, verkündete er, seine Lehre von der Grundnorm nicht mehr vertreten zu können. In anderen zu dieser Zeit geschriebenen Aufsätzen findet man Vergleichbares. Damit mußte seine berühmte Reine Rechtslehre zusammenbrechen. Wie konnte es hierzu kommen? Es wird verschiedentlich behauptet, sein Aufenthalt in Amerika habe die entscheidende Rolle gespielt (im Mai 1940 verließ er zusammen mit seiner Frau Margarete die Schweiz). Doch die entscheidenden Entwicklungen, die schließlich zur Aufgabe des klassischen Kelsenschen Instrumentariums führten, vollzogen sich bereits lange vorher in Europa.


  20. Lawyers as Insincere Actors

    Prof. Lawrence Solan (Brooklyn Law School)

    Vortrag gehalten am 04.11.2010

    Zur Person:
    Nach seinem Bachelor-Abschluss an der Brandeis University erwarb Solan den Ph.D. in Linguistik an der University of Massachusetts sowie den J.D. an der Harvard Law School. Bevor Lawrence Solan 1996 an die Universität wechselte war er Partner in der Kanzlei Orans, Elsen and Lupert und zuvor Assistent von Richter Stewart Pollock am Supreme Court von New Jersey. Seit 2002 ist er Direktor des Center for the Study of Law, Language and Cognition an der Brooklyn Law School. Zwei Jahre darauf wurde er dort Don Forchelli Professor of Law. Im Jahr 2009 verlieh ihm das Wuhan Institute of Technology eine Honorarprofessur. Er war Visiting Professor an der Yale Law School sowie Gaststipendiat an der psychologischen Fakultät der Princeton University. Er war Präsident der International Association of Forensic Linguistics, ist Mitglied der International Academy of Law and Mental Health und Mitherausgeber des International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law. Gegenwärtig ist Lawrence Solan Visiting Fellow im Department of Psychology und Visiting Professor im Council of the Humanities and Linguistics an der Princeton University.

    Lawrence Solans wissenschaftliche Beiträge wurden in den führenden amerikanischen Zeitschriften veröffentlicht. Zu seinen wichtigsten bisher erschienenen Büchern zählen The Language of Judges (1993), mit dem er eine wegweisende Arbeit auf dem Gebiet der theoretischen Linguistik und juristischen Argumentation vorlegte, und Speaking of Crime: The Language of Criminal Justice (gemeinsam mit Peter Tiersma, 2005). Demnächst erscheint von ihm Under the Law: Statutes and Their Interpretation und in Mitherausgeberschaft mit Peter Tiersma The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law.

    Abstract:
    Lawyers are given license to suspend what philosophers have called sincerity conditions. We ordinarily take people as being sincere in their speech. They expect us to do so, just as we, when we speak, expect others to take us as being sincere. Lawyers, however, are given license to be insincere. They are trained to be simultaneously truthful and insincere. On the one hand, they are required to tell the truth in the context of legal proceedings. On the other, they are insincere in that they routinely structure their speech to lead others into drawing inferences that will serve the lawyer’s goals, whether or not those inferences reflect a fair assessment of facts or law. This paper looks at the distinction between lying and deception, and finds some moral distinction, but not enough to justify the conduct acceptable by the legal profession on moral grounds. The paper discusses aspects of our psychology that make us vulnerable to the kind of deception practiced by lawyers, and concludes by criticizing American legal education for not imbuing a sense of responsibility in young lawyers that should accompany the license to be insincere. While the article focuses on lawyers working in the American adversarial system, many of the observations and issues apply to lawyers working in other legal systems as well.


  21. Mechanical Brains and Responsible Choices

    Prof. Michael Moore (University of Illinois)

    Vortrag gehalten am 18.03.2010

    Michael Moore ist einer der prominentesten Vertreter der neueren amerikanischen Naturrechtslehre, die er um einen eigenständigen naturalistischen Ansatz bereichert hat. Seine Forschungen bewegen sich vornehmlich an der Schnittstelle zwischen Recht und Philosophie, aber auch anderer Nachbarwissenschaften wie der Psychologie und der Politikwissenschaft.

    Nach seinem Bachelor-Abschluss in Politikwissenschaften an der University of Oregon besuchte Moore die Harvard University und erwarb dort sowohl den J.D., als auch den S.J.D., letzteren mit einer Dissertation zum Thema Law and Psychiatry: Rethinking the Relationship (Cambridge University Press, 1984), in der er die oft divergierenden Krankheitskonzeptionen im Recht und der Psychiatrie untersucht. Nach Stationen in Berkeley, an der University of Southern California und an der Universität von Kansas wurde Michael Moore im Jahre 2002 auf den Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. Chair berufen, den ersten universitätsübergreifenden Lehrstuhl aller drei Illinoier Universitäten. Er gehört dort sowohl dem College of Law als auch dem College of Liberal Arts and Sciences an. Miochael Moore erhielt bereits mehrere namhafte Forschungsstipendien, u. a. in dem Law and Humanities Program der Harvard University und durch das Humanities Research Institute der University of California.

    Neben acht Büchern hat Michael Moore zahlreiche größere Beiträge verfasst, die in den führenden amerikanischen Zeitschriften veröffentlicht worden sind. Zu seinen wichtigsten Arbeiten gehört Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law (Oxford University Press, 1993), in dem Moore eine vereinigende Theorie der Handlung für das britische und das amerikanische Strafrecht entwickelte. Placing Blame, a General Theory of the Criminal Law (Oxford University Press, 1997) stellt einen der führenden modernen Beiträge zu den strafrechtlichen Vergeltungstheorien dar. Daneben treten grundlegende Abhandlungen zur Rechtsontologie und zur juristischen Methodenlehre, darunter Legal Reality: A Naturalist Approach to Legal Ontology (Law and Philosophy, Vol. 21, 2002, pp. 619-705) und A Natural Law Theory of Interpretation (Southern California Law Review, Vol. 58, 1985, pp. 277-398).

    Michael Moores jüngste Veröffentlichung ist Causation and Responsibility (Oxford University Press, 2009), worin er den juristischen Kausalitätsbegriff im Anschluss an neuere philosophische und wissenschaftstheoretische Kausalitätstheorien entfaltet. Eng verwandt damit ist auch das Thema seines Vortrags in Freiburg, der das Problem der rechtlichen und moralischen Verantwortung vor dem Hintergrund der aktuellen Forschung in den Neurowissenschaften behandelt. Dabei Moore die Frage, inwiefern sich die aktuelle Herausforderung von den Ergebnissen früherer psychologischer Ansätze, etwa bei Hobbes, Freud oder Skinner, unterscheidet.

Audio

Abonnieren per RSS | iTunesU
  1. Powers and Competences

    Prof. Jaap Hage, Faculty of Law, University of Maastricht

    Vortrag gehalten am 10.12.2015

    Zur Person:

    Jaap Hage studierte Rechtswissenschaften und Philosophie an der Universität Leiden. Nachdem er für eine kurze Zeit auf dem Gebiet der Informatik forschte, lehrt und arbeitet er seit 1978 als Professor für Allgemeine Rechtslehre zunächst an der Universität Leiden und heute an der Universität Maastricht. Zu seinen bisherigen Veröffentlichungen gehören die Werke „Feiten en betekenis“ (Dissertation zur Praktischen Vernunft), „Reasoning with Rules“, und „Studies in Legal Logic“.


    Abstract:

    In the jurisprudential literature, the notions of legal power and legal competence are usually not well distinguished. The present article tries to develop such a clear distinction.
    The existence of a legal power is described as a side-effect of legal rules that make it possible to bring about particular results. For example, Charlène has the legal power to reduce her tax obligations by moving from Belgium to Monaco. (The example is on purpose not of a juridical act.) Legal powers can be the side-effect of the existence of counts-as, fact-to-fact, and dynamic rules.
    A legal capacity is described as a status, attributed by a legal rule, which is a necessary prerequisite for bringing about legal consequences by means of a juridical act. For example, Parliament has the competence to create statutes. Without this competence an attempt to make a statute would be invalid.
    The concept of a legal competence is in first instance an internal legal concept, meaning that it is a concept used in legal rules. In this respect it differs from the concept of a legal power, which is not used in legal rules, even though legal powers exist because of legal rules. The concept of a legal power is an external legal concept.
    If a legal power is to be exercised by means of a juridical act, but only then, the competence to do so is a necessary condition for the existence of this power.


  2. The Structure of Arguments by Analogy in Law

    Prof. Claudio Michelon, Professor of Philosophy of Law, Edinburgh Law School, University of Edinburgh

    Vortrag gehalten am 19.11.2015

    Zur Person:

    An der Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brasilien) absolvierte Prof. Claudio Michelon das Studium der Philosophie, das er 1992 mit einem LL.B und
    1996 mit dem Master in Philosophie abschloss. 2001 promovierte er an der University of Edinburgh. Von 2001 bis 2006 lebte Prof. Michelon in Brasilien, wo er als Rechtsanwalt praktizierte und Assistant Professor an der Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul war. Seit 2007 ist er Professor für Rechtsphilosophie an der University of Edinburgh.

    Abstract:

    The Structure of Arguments by Analogy in Law

    This paper discusses the structure of arguments by analogy in law. The first part of the paper takes issue with the best known (contemporary account of the structure of legal analogical argument: Martin P. Golding’s. Golding’s account gives expression to a very popular picture of analogical arguments. For him, arguments by analogy fit the following scheme:

    (1) x has characteristics F, G . . . (2) y has characteristics F, G . . . (3) x has characteristic H.
    (4) F, G . . . are H-relevant characteristics. Therefore (from (1), (2), (3), and (4)),
    (5)Unless there are countervailing considerations, y has characteristic H.

    This paper presents two objections to conceiving analogical argument in these terms: (a) the source case is argumentatively idle and (b) the argument fails to account for the normative nature of the conclusion of legal analogies.
    The second part of the paper presents and defends an alternative account of the structure of arguments by analogy in law. There are (at least) three advantages of the proposed characterisation.
    First, the scheme discharges the two burdens identified in the discussion of Golding’s scheme: it accounts for the normative character of analogical arguments in law, and retains the argumentative relevance of the source case. Second, the theoretical framework that informs the scheme allows for an integrated understanding of how precedent works in legal argument. Third, the scheme and the theoretical framework also enable one to make sense of some popular claims about judicial reasoning. One example is the idea law might in some instances develop on the back of reasoning “from case to case” without the necessary articulation (at any given step) of any general unifying rules.


  3. Psychology, Morality, and (Public) Law: The Role of Loss Aversion

    Prof. Dr. Eyal Zamir (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel)

    Vortrag gehalten am 2. Juli 2014

    Zur Person:
    Eyal Zamir ist Professor für Wirtschaftsrecht an der Hebräischen Universität Jerusalem und Direktor der Aharon-Barak-Forschungsstelle für Interdisziplinäre Rechtsstudien. Er erlangte einen Bachelor in Rechtswissenschaften (LL.B.) an der Hebräischen Universität Jerusalem, wo er zudem in Rechtswissenschaften promovierte und sich habilitierte.
    Eyal Zamir war Gastprofessor an den Universitäten Harvard, Yale, NYU, Georgetown, UCLA, Zürich und am Max-Planck-Institut für Ökonomik in Jena. Des Weiteren gab er dreizehn Werke heraus (drei von diesen mit der Oxford University Press) und veröffentlichte zahlreiche Artikel in israelischen und amerikanischen rechtswissenschaftlichen Fachzeitschriften (u.a. „Columbia Law Review“, „Journal of Legal Studies“, „California Law Review“, „Virginia Law Review“ und „American Journal of International Law“).

    Abstract:
    Why are civil and political rights accorded much greater constitutional protection than social and economic rights? Why do constitutions limit the state’s power to take private property but hardly limit its power to confer property to private entities, or require them to charge recipients for such benefits? What might explain the fact that affirmative action plans refer to benefits that people do not yet have, such as getting a job, but rarely, if ever, dictate that an employee who already occupies a certain position should vacate it for someone else? How come immigration and refugee law (and even more so—immigration and refugee practice) treat refugees and asylum seekers who have already entered a state’s territory—lawfully or not—rather differently than those who seek entry?
    While not trying to give a comprehensive answer to these questions, I will argue that there is a common denominator to these and other puzzles (including ones that arise in private law, such as the centrality of tort law versus the relative marginality of unjust enrichment law): they are all best answered on the basis of loss aversion. Psychological studies have established that people do not perceive outcomes as final states of wealth or welfare. Rather, they perceive them as gains and losses, and losses ordinarily loom larger than gains. Loss aversion is thus related to fundamental legal issues.
    I will also strive to explain the compatibility between loss aversion and the law. According to an evolutionary theory, since losses are more painful than unattained gains, people file lawsuits when they experience a loss much more often than when the fail to obtain a gain. Consequently, legal doctrines dealing with the former are much more developed. Another theory focuses on the mindset of legal policymakers. Legal thinking largely follows deontological morality. As such, it distinguishes between harming people and not aiding them. This theory highlights an important correspondence between psychology, morality, and law.
    Finally, I will touch upon the normative implications of loss aversion. Among other things, I will argue that, ceteris paribus, the law should favor not-giving over taking. Lawmakers should also consider the framing effect of legal norms and the impact of loss aversion on policymaking.


  4. Überlegungen zur idealen Dimension des Recht und zur Rechtsphilosophie von John Finnis

    Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Robert Alexy (Kiel)

    Vortrag gehalten am 28. November 2013

    Abstract:

    In der jüngeren Diskussion über das Verhältnis von Recht und Moral ist sowohl auf der positivistischen Seite, etwa von Joseph Raz, als auch auf der nichtpositivistischen Seite, etwa von John Finnis, die These vertreten worden, dass die klassische Frage, ob notwendige Verbindungen zwischen Recht und Moral existieren, die falsche Frage sei, um den Streit zwischen Positivismus und Nichtpositivismus zu entscheiden. Der Vortrag stellt dem die These gegenüber, dass die Frage nach notwendigen Verbindungen zwischen Recht und Moral notwendig ist, um jenen Streit einer Lösung näher zu führen. Das kann als „Notwendigkeitsthese“ bezeichnet werden. Die Basis der Notwendigkeitsthese ist eine weitere These, die Doppelnaturthese, welche sagt, dass das Recht notwendig sowohl eine reale oder faktische Dimension hat als auch eine ideale oder kritische. Das alles wird vor dem Hintergrund der Rechtsphilosophie von John Finnis erörtert.


  5. Die Verfassung als normative Rahmenordnung. Eine deutsch-französische Perspektive

    Prof. Dr. Armel Le Divellec (Universität Paris2, Panthéon-Assas)

    Vortrag gehalten am 11.06.2013

    Abstract:
    Haben Juristen einen akzeptablen Verfassungsbegriff? Wie viele Grundbegriffe des Rechtslebens und -denkens bleibt die Verfassung eine schwer erfassbare Kategorie. Trotz erheblicher Anstrengung der Staatsrechtslehre, insbesondere in Deutschland, scheint die Suche nach einem angemessenen Begriff der (liberal-demokratischen) Verfassung unbefriedigend. Gewiss, jede Theorie der Verfassung hängt von eigenen erkenntnistheoretischen Vorfragen ab. Und die Mannigfaltigkeit der möglichen Grundsatzpositionen bringt eine Fülle von verschiedenen Verfassungsbegriffen mit sich.

    Dennoch lohnt es sich vielleicht, von einem möglichst ,,undogmatischen" Standpunkt ausgehend, den Versuch erneut zu unternehmen, einen Verfassungsbegriff vorzuschlagen, der in Anlehnung an die, zugleich aber auch in Modifizierung der von Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde geprägten Formel die Verfassung als normative Rahmenordnung versteht. Dieser Versuch wird im Dialog mit Autoren unterschiedlicher Rechtskulturen, insbesondere solchen französischer und deutscher Provenienz, unternommen.


  6. Hate Speech and Self-Restraint

    Prof. Dr. Arthur Jacobson (Cardozo Law School)

    Vortrag gehalten am: 05.06.2013

    Zur Person:
    Arthur J. Jacobson ist Professor an der Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law der Yeshiva University in New York. Er studierte Jura und Politikwissenschaften in Harvard, wo er 1978 mit einer Arbeit zur politischen Philosophie Hegels promoviert wurde. Noch während seines Studiums wurde er 1977 Assistenzprofessor und schließlich 1981 ordentlicher Professor an der Cardozo School of Law. Seine Forschungsinteressen erstrecken sich zum einen auf Materien des modernen amerikanischen Rechts, besonders des Vertragsrechts, Arbeitsrechts, Antidiskriminierungsrechts und Anwaltsrechts, und zum anderen auf die Rechtsphilosophie (Plato, Spinoza, Hegel, Derrida, Luhmann, Habermas) und das Verfassungsrecht (Demokratie, Weimarer Republik).


    Abstract:
    "Hate Speech and Self-Restraint" demolishes a truism of comparative constitutional law. The truism is that the United States is the only constitutional democracy not to regulate hate speech. True, it does not criminalize hate speech as such. But the institutions of civil society in the United States patrol hate speech with far greater ferocity and effect than any prosecutor pursuing crimes. The talk will lay out and examine the three institutions and propose a characteristically "American" model of self-restraint in civil society as opposed to restraint by the state. The good baron, M. de Tocqueville, would be pleased that what he described over 170 years ago remains true to this day.


  7. Incommensurability, Proportionality and Defeasibility

    Prof. Dr. Chapman (University of Toronto)

    Vortrag gehalten am 17.04.2013

    Zur Person:
    Bruce Chapman ist Professor an der Rechtswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Universität Toronto und ehemaliger Herausgeber des University of Toronto Law Journals. Er verfügt über einen Doktortitel in Wirtschaftswissenschaften der Universität Cambridge und war unter anderem Assistenzprofessor am Department of Philosophy der University of Western Ontario sowie Gastdozent auf fast allen Kontinenten, etwa in Oxford, Singapur, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgien), Buenos Aires und Canberra. Hauptgebiete seiner zahlreichen Veröffentlichungen sind neben Rechtstheorie und Deliktsrecht insbesondere auch die wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Analyse des Rechts sowie die Entscheidungstheorie. Er erhielt wiederholt Forschungsstipendien für seine Arbeiten im Bereich der rationalen Entscheidungsfindung. Ein wichtiges Werk aus jüngerer Zeit ist der Aufsatz „Defeasible Rules and Interpersonal Accountability“ (erschienen in J. Ferrer und G. B. Ratti (Hrsg.), Essays in Legal Defeasibility, Oxford University Press 2011).

    Abstract:
    At least in some cases, the values confronted in legal decision-making appear to be incommensurable. Some legal theorists resist incommensurability because they fear that this presents an overwhelming obstacle to rational decision-making. By offering a close analysis of proportionality and, more particularly, measures of proportional value satisfaction, I show that this fear is unfounded. Comparative measures of proportional value satisfaction do not require the values to be commensurable. However, assuming incommensurability presents us with the problem of public significance in the proportional satisfaction of values. When two values are commensurable, this public significance is provided by the mediating effects of the overarching third value that provides the common measure of the values. However, when this common measure is removed, then the public significance of value satisfaction must be otherwise achieved. This is why I propose an equal proportional value satisfaction as the most appropriate proportionality maximand. Under equal proportional value satisfaction, the proportional satisfaction of any one value has significance for each and every other value. This kind of public significance is interpersonal rather than impersonal (or second-personal rather than third-personal). The paper then shows that the legal process that is most appropriate to equal proportionality is a process that implements defeasible legal rules.


  8. Die politische Rolle der Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit

    Prof. Dr. Oliver Lepsius (Universität Bayreuth)

    Vortrag gehalten am 22. 12. 2012

    Abstract:

    Fast alle politischen Fragen lassen sich verfassungsrechtlich zu Rechtsfragen umformulieren - wenn das Bundesverfassungsgericht dies will. Ist das Bundesverfassungsgericht als Verfassungsorgan also ein politischer Akteur? Und wenn ja: Darf es das sein und was folgt daraus für seine Aufgaben, Kompetenzen und Grenzen? Das BVerfG hat immer schon über politische Grundsatzfragen entschieden (Abtreibung, Grundlagenvertrag mit der DDR, europäische Integration und vieles mehr). Es liegt in der Natur der Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit, Rechtsfragen zu entscheiden, die zugleich politische Richtungsentscheidungen betreffen und den Mehrheitswillen in der Demokratie begrenzen. Wenn der Eindruck nicht täuscht, nehmen solche Verfahren eher zu. Liegt das an der Dysfunktionalität des politischen Systems? Liegt es an einer Selbstermächtigung in Karlsruhe? Wie sollte sich das Gericht in der Zwickmühle von Verfassungsbindung und Primat der Politik institutionell verhalten? Unter welchen Bedingungen gibt es eine Berechtigung zu politischen Entscheidungen der Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit?
    Mit diesen Fragen setzt sich der Vortrag auseinander und versucht, eine Perspektive für die deutsche Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit im 21. Jahrhundert zu formulieren.


  9. Der Stufenbau der Rechtsordnung - Zur Belastbarkeit eines Konzepts

    Prof. Dr. Ewald Wiederin (Universität Wien)

    Vortrag gehalten am 12.06.2012

    Abstract:
    Die Lehre vom Stufenbau der Rechtsordnung zählt zu den echten Innovationen, die der Rechtstheorie im 20. Jahrhundert gelungen sind. Sie hat die Gesetzesfixierung der Rechtswissenschaft aufgebrochen und eine pluralistische Rechtsquellentheorie entwickelt, in der neben Verordnungen auch Urteile und Verwaltungsakte ihren Platz haben; sie hat die Verfassungsgerichtsbarkeit theoretisch legitimiert und ein einheitliches rechtliches Weltbild postuliert, in das auch das Völkerrecht integriert werden kann; sie hat den unpolitischen, rein nach rechtlichen Maßstäben urteilenden Richter entmythifiziert und seine politische Rolle freigelegt.
    So weitreichend ihre Implikationen und so suggestiv ihre Bilder sind, so wenig ausgearbeitet ist die Stufenbautheorie im Kern. Zwar wird zwischen einem Stufenbau nach der rechtlichen Bedingtheit und einem Stufenbau nach der derogatorischen Kraft unterschieden; hier wie dort bleibt jedoch im Vagen, wie das die Stufungen generierende Kriterium zu definieren ist. Der Vortrag spürt den verschiedenen Konzeptionen rechtlicher Bedingtheit sowie derogatorischer Kraft nach. Er plädiert dafür, die Vorstellung eines Stufenbaus nach der rechtlichen Bedingtheit zu verabschieden, an der derogatorischen Kraft als ordnungsstiftendem Element jedoch festzuhalten und die Stufenbaulehre als theoretischen Rahmen zu konzipieren, der differenzierte Rechtswidrigkeiten sowie rechtswidriges Recht zu beschreiben und die damit einhergehenden dogmatischen Probleme adäquat zu behandeln erlaubt.


  10. Law and Neuroscience

    Prof. Dr. Dennis Patterson (European University Institute Florenz)

    Vortrag gehalten am 24.05.2012

    Zur Person:
    Dennis Patterson hat seit September 2009 den Lehrstuhl für Rechtstheorie und Rechtsphilosophie am European University Institute in Florenz inne. Darüber hinaus ist er Professor für Rechtsphilosophie und Internationales Handelsrecht an der Swansea University in Wales sowie Board of Governors Professor an der Rutgers Law School, New Jersey, wo er seit 1990 lehrt. Er erhielt Senior Research Grants unter anderem von der Fulbright-Kommission, der Humboldt-Stiftung und dem American Council of Learned Societies. Dennis Patterson war Gastprofessor an zahlreichen Universitäten, etwa in Berlin, Wien, London und Sydney, und hat zahlreiche Bücher und Artikel zu Rechtsphilosophie, Wirtschaftsrecht und Handelsrecht veröffentlicht. Zu nennen sind hier insbesondere die zusammen mit Ari Afilalo verfasste Monographie The New Global Trading Order: The Evolving State and the Future of Trade sowie das in mehrere Sprachen, darunter Deutsch, übersetzte Werk Law and Truth. Zur Zeit arbeitet er an Monographien über allgemeine Rechtslehre und die Grundlagen internationalen Rechts sowie an einer Serie von Artikeln zum Verhältnis von Recht und Neurowissenschaften.

    Abstract:
    Neuroscientific evidence continues to make its way into legal proceedings around the world. Despite its increasing importance, especially in criminal proceedings, there is far from universal consensus on the scientific reliability of such evidence. This presentation will describe some of the current controversies surrounding the use of neuroscientific evidence in legal proceedings. Among the topics I shall discuss are: the reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques; the admissibility of neuroscientific evidence in US Courts; and some of the basic philosophical controversies about the relationship of mind to brain.


  11. Norm und Begründung: die paratopische Systemverschiebung

    Prof. Dr. Dr. Otto Pfersmann (Universität Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne)

    Vortrag gehalten am 12.01.2012

    Zur Person:
    Otto Pfersmann ist Professor für Rechtstheorie und Vergleichendes Verfassungsrecht an der Universität Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. Von 2000 bis 2002 war er Kodirektor des In-stitute of European and Comparative Law in Oxford. Er ist Gastprofessor an verschiede-nen Universitäten in Belgien, Italien, Israel, Norwegen, der Schweiz, Ungarn, den Vereinigten Staaten und Mitglied der Redaktion mehrerer Zeitschriften und des Direktoriums wissenschaftlicher Vereinigungen. Zu seinen jüngeren Publikationen zählen „Le sophis-me onomastique. A propos de l’interprétation de la constitution” (Paris 2005), „Dibattito sul interpretazione giuridica” (Neapel 2007), „The only constitution and it's many enemies” (Utrecht 2010) und „Explanation and Production: Two Ways of Using and Constructing Legal Argumentation” (Heidelberg 2010).

    Abstract:
    In der zeitgenössischen Rechtsentwicklung lassen sich folgende zwei Phänomene beobachten: 1) Höchstgerichte tendieren dazu, mittels verschiedener Techniken, Spruch und Begründung zusammenzufügen; 2) die Lehre stellt das Verfassungsrecht (Europarecht, Verwaltungsrecht, Privatrecht usf.) an Hand der von den Gerichten gelieferten Begründungen dar. Diese Entwicklung wird heute als natürlich betrachtet; sie ist im höchsten Maße problematisch – und zwar aus begrifflichen, logischen wie juristischen Überlegungen. Begrifflich gesehen, gehören Begründungen und Sprüche zwei völlig unterschiedlichen Aussageformen an. In logischer Hinsicht, besteht zwischen diesen Sätzen dieser unterschiedlichen Arten keinerlei deduktive Verknüpfung. In rechtlicher Hinsicht wäre eine solche Hypothese – wäre sie überhaupt möglich – einerseits eine Verletzung der Begründungspflicht, andererseits bestünde sie in der Einführung einer Normenkategorie ohne (Rechtssatz-)Form. Das Verfassungsrecht (Europarecht, Verwaltungsrecht, Privatrecht usf.) wäre solcherart zu einer Menge paratopischer Normen geworden.


  12. Legal Positivism and the Normativity of Law

    Prof. Torben Spaak (Uppsala Universität)

    Vortrag gehalten am 30.11.2011

    Zur Person:
    Torben Spaak ist Professor der Rechtswissenschaften an der Uppsala Universität. Er unterrichtete an der Minnesota Law School und war Gastprofessor in Buenos Aires, Genua und Minneapolis. Er ist Mitglied der schwedischen Sektion der Internationalen Vereinigung für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie. Sein Forschungs- und Interessenschwerpunkt liegt im Bereich der analytischen Rechtswissenschaft, wobei er sich besonders auch um die Erschließung des skandinavischen Rechtsrealismus verdient gemacht hat. Zu seinen Monographien zählen „The Concept of Legal Competence“ (1994) und „Guidance and Constraint. The Action-Guiding Capacity of Theories of Legal Reasoning” (2007). Daneben treten eine Vielzahl von Beiträgen zu Grundfragen der Rechtstheorie. Zur Zeit arbeitet er an einer Monographie zum Problem der Natur des Rechts.

    Abstract:
    In this presentation, I discuss the problem of the normativity of law conceived within the framework of legal positivism, that is, the problem of accounting within this framework for the sense, if any, in which law confers rights and duties, or, if you will, provides normative reasons for action.
    I begin by explaining how I understand the problem of the normativity of law. I suggest (i) that we think of the function of the legal ‘ought’ as that of connecting the consequence with the condition(s) in a legal norm, as Kelsen does, and of the relevant type of normative reason for action as external reasons in Bernard Williams’s sense. I then argue (ii) that there is only one sense of normativity, only one sense of ‘ought’, (iii) that we need to distinguish between different grades of normativity, at the very least between social and justified normativity (as Raz calls them), and (iv) that the relevant grade of normativity in this context is justified normativity.

    I then turn to a consideration of the main tenets of legal positivism, namely the social thesis, the separation thesis, the thesis of social efficacy, and add a few words about the semantic thesis. And I explain what it is about legal positivism – namely the separation thesis – that makes it so difficult to come up with a satisfactory solution to this problem. I add a few words here about the logical relation between the social thesis and the separation thesis.

    Having come thus far, I introduce the solution to the problem of law’s normativity proposed by Hans Kelsen, namely that legal positivists need to presuppose the basic norm, if and insofar as they wish to conceive of the legal materials as a system of valid, that is, binding, norms. I explain (i) that Kelsen operates with the idea of justified, not social, normativity, and emphasize (ii) that, on Kelsen’s analysis, the presupposition of the basic norm is conditional. I then maintain that a solution to the problem of legal normativity along the lines of Kelsen’s analysis is all that legal positivists can hope for, while acknowledging that this solution is widely thought to be no solution at all.

    The presentation concludes with a consideration of two recent attempts to account for the normativity of law made by Scott Shapiro and Andrei Marmor, respectively. Whereas Shapiro maintains that law is first and foremost a social planning mechanism, and that a person who has legal authority has moral authority from the legal point of view, Marmor argues that the foundation of law is to be found in conventions of a certain type, namely constitutive conventions. I conclude, however, that neither author has been able to improve substantially on Kelsen’s analysis as regards the central question. On all three analyses, the upshot is that the normativity of law, conceived within the framework of legal positivism, can only be conditional upon the adoption of a certain, normative perspective or point of view. And this, I point out, is precisely what one should expect, given the centrality of the separation thesis in the positivistic framework.


  13. Coercion as/and the Concept of Law

    Prof. Frederick Schauer (University of Virginia)

    Vortrag gehalten am 08.06.2011

    Zur Person:
    Frederick Schauer ist David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law an der University of Virginia. Zuvor war er 18 Jahre als Professor of First Amendment an der John F. Kennedy School of Government der Havard University und als Professor of Law an der University of Michigan tätig. Er war außerdem Gründer und Co-Editor der Fachzeitschrift “Legal Theory”, Vize-Präsident der American Society of Political and Legal Philosophy und Vorsitzender des Commitee on Philosophy and Law. Zu seinen Werken zählen “The Law of Obscenity“ (1976), “Free Speech: A Philosophical Enquiry” (1982), “Playing By the Rules: A Philosophical Examination of Rule-Based Decision-Making in Law and Life” (1991), “Profiles, Probabilities and Stereotypes (2003), “Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New introduction to Legal Reasoning” (2009).

    Abstract:
    Until the publication of H.L.A. Hart’s The Concept of Law fifty years ago, it was widely accepted that a central feature of law was its coercive power. Unlike the norms and rules of games, morality, and etiquette, for example, the norms and rules of law were backed by the power of the state, legitimately, to punish those who violated them. Thus, the overwhelming view of legal theorists, including Bentham, Austin, and Kelsen, most prominently, was that coercion was a key component of law itself.

    In Hart’s attack on Austin, and thus on Bentham, Kelsen, and many others, he sought to show that law was about the union of primary and secondary rules, and about the internalization of the master secondary rule, the ultimate rule of recognition, by legal officials. Coercion played no part in the story, and for Hart and countless of his successors, especially in Anglophone analytic jurisprudence, coercion, because it is not strictly logically necessary for the existence of law on Hart’s account, could not be part of the concept of law.

    This project is an attempt to place coercion back in the center of legal philosophical thinking. Even if Hart is correct in imagining a possible legal system in a possible world in which coercion is not present, it is surely not irrelevant that all real legal systems employ coercion, and that coercion remains the principal characteristic distinguishing legal systems from other norms systems. To move from the prevalence of coercion to the claim that coercion remains the central feature of law itself, however, requires establishing, first, that the nature of law is better captured by its typical truths than by its logically necessary ones, and, second, that the conceptualization of a human artifact such as law is better understood as a cluster or family resemblance concept than through a set of individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions.


  14. Die Kultur des Denunziatorischen

    Prof. Dr. Bernhard Schlink (HU Berlin)

    Vortrag gehalten am 25.05.2011

    Zur Person:
    Bernhard Schlink studierte Jura in Heidelberg und Berlin, war als wissenschaftlicher Assistent in Darmstadt, Bielefeld und Freiburg tätig, wurde in Heidelberg mit einer Arbeit zur Abwägung im Verfassungsrecht promoviert und habilitierte sich in Freiburg mit einer Schrift zu Gewaltenteilung in der Verwaltung.

    Schlink war als Professor für Öffentliches Recht und Rechtsphilosophie an den Universitäten Bonn, Frankfurt und in Berlin tätig. Als Richter am Verfassungsgerichtshof des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen war er in Münster von 1987 bis 2006 beschäftigt. Darüber hinaus erlangte Schlink auch als Autor von preisgekrönten Romanen (u.a. „Der Vorleser“) internationalen Ruhm. Gegenwärtig beschäftigt er sich insbesondere mit der Verhältnismäßigkeit im Verfassungsvergleich.

    Abstract:

    Wozu waren und sind Juristen als Wissenschaftler wie als Praktiker moralisch verpflichtet? Nach welchen Kriterien sollen Historiker moralisch urteilen? Welche Berücksichtigung der damaligen Maßstäbe und Möglichkeiten schuldet ein heutiges moralisches Urteil über vergangenes Handeln?

    Bernhard Schlink beobachtet in der Rechts-, der Geschichts- und der Literaturwissenschaft einen Hang zur moralischen Bewertung, der denunziatorisch gerät. In seinem Vortrag unterzieht er die moralische Auseinandersetzung mit politischer, Rechts- und Literaturgeschichte einer kritischen Bestandsaufnahme. Anhand konkreter Beispiele zeigt er auf, wie Bewertungen von der Höhe heutiger Moral die in anderer Zeit und anderer Situation handelnden Menschen verfehlen. Er fragt, warum diese „Kultur des Denunziatorischen“ so dominant geworden ist und wohin sie führt.

    Hinweis: Der Vortrag beruht auf einem Aufsatz von Prof. Dr. Schlink, der unter demselben Titel in der Zeitschrift "Merkur" im Juni 2011 erschienen ist.


  15. Menschenwürde in Politik, Ethik und Recht

    Prof. Dr. Matthias Mahlmann (Universität Zürich)

    Vortrag gehalten am 11.05.2011

    Zur Person:
    Matthias Mahlmann studierte Rechtswissenschaften und Philosophie an den Universitäten Freiburg im Breisgau und Berlin sowie an der London School of Economics. Er promovierte 1999 zu „Rationalismus in der praktischen Theorie: Normentheorie und praktische Kompetenz“ und habilitierte sich 2005 mit der Arbeit „Elemente einer ethischen Grundrechtstheorie“. Seit dem Wintersemester 2005/2006 ist Professor Mahlmann Recurrent Visiting Professor an der Central European University in Budapest. 2007 wurde er Heisenberg-Stipendiat der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft. Seit dem Sommersemester 2008 ist Matthias Mahlmann Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Rechtstheorie, Rechtssoziologie und Internationales öffentliches Recht an der Universität Zürich. Der Schwerpunkt von Professor Mahlmanns wissenschaftlicher Arbeit liegt in der Rechtsphilosophie, der Theorie des Geistes, den Kognitionswissenschaften sowie in den Grundlagen von Ethik und Recht.

    Abstract:

    Menschenwürde ist ein Leitbegriff des modernen Rechts. Er fundiert Verfassungsordnungen und prägt die internationalen Systeme zum Schutz der Menschenrechte. Würde ist gleichzeitig ein zentraler Gegenstand der Reflexion der Ethik, nicht erst seit und nicht nur wegen ihrer Rolle in Kants Theorie der praktischen Vernunft. Die Würde der Menschen bildet nicht zuletzt auch ein Element entscheidender politischer Auseinandersetzungen und Kämpfe in der Geschichte und Gegenwart, um die Gestaltung von Lebensbedingungen, die Anteile der Einzelnen am Wohlstand einer Gesellschaft oder die Rechte von Menschen als mitbestimmende politische Subjekte der sozialen Ordnung.

    Was ist aber gemeint mit dem Begriff der Menschenwürde? Hat dieser Begriff überhaupt einen bestimmbaren Gehalt oder dient das laute Pathos seiner Verwendung nur dazu, seine ungreifbare Unbestimmtheit zu übertönen? Kann der Anspruch auf Universalität der Idee der Menschenwürde, der in der modernen Menschenrechtsarchitektur verkörpert liegt, eingelöst werden? Oder ist dieser Anspruch die täuschende Fassade vor der sich rechtlich, ethisch und politisch durchsetzenden kulturellen Relativität dessen, was Menschenwürde in
    konkreten Zusammenhängen tatsächlich bedeutet? Diese Fragen werden im internationalen Rahmen intensiv diskutiert. Das ist nicht verwunderlich, denn sie führen zu Problemen des normativen Fundaments modernen Rechts.


  16. The Judge in the Experts' Room

    Prof. Damiano Canale (Bocconi Universität Mailand)

    Vortrag gehalten am 19.01.2011

    Zur Person:
    Damiano Canale studierte Politikwissenschaften an der Universität Padua, Rechtswissenschaften an der Universität Würzburg und spezialisierte sich dann an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt auf Rechtstheorie. Seinen PhD in Rechtsphilosophie erhielt er an der Universität Padua. Als Gastwissenschaftler arbeitete er am Max-Plank-Institut für Europäische Rechtsgeschichte in Frankfurt am Main und an der Yale Law School in New Haven Conneticut, USA. An den Universitäten Padua und Rovigo war er außerdem als Gastprofessor tätig. Derzeit lehrt Professor Damiano Canale an der Bocconi Universität Mailand.

    Der Schwerpunkt von Damiano Canales wissenschaftlicher Arbeit liegt in der Theorie der Rechtsauslegung und Beweisführung, der Geschichte von Rechtsbegriffen, sowie der sozialwissenschaftlichen Methodologie und der Handlungstheorie.


    Abstract:
    In contemporary legal systems, policymaking and adjudication are more and more conditioned by scientific expertise that often determines the content of public policies and makes the difference between right and wrong. This is particularly apparent if we look at role of experts in adjudication, whose increasing weight is sometimes seen as a threat to the autonomy of law. However, legal theorists are not particularly sensitive to this phenomenon. The relevance of scientific expertise in law is normally restricted to the process of fact-finding, whereas the inclusion of technical, non-juridical contents in the legal regulation seems not to be an issue.

    In this paper I shall argue that the inclusion of non-juridical technicalities in the law can give rise to a serious problem of interpretation although their content is perfectly determined. I will label this problem "the opacity of law" and consider its characteristics, forms and conceptual implications.


  17. Das Ende der Reinen Rechtslehre?

    Prof. Dr. Stanley Paulson (Washington University / Universität zu Kiel)

    Vortrag gehalten am 15.12.2010

    Zur Person:
    Stanley L. Paulson wuchs in Minneapolis auf und studierte Philosophie an den Universitäten Minnesota (B.A.) und Wisconsin-Madison (M.A., Ph.D). Seinen law degree (J.D.) legte er an der Harvard University ab.
    Seit 1972 unterrichtet er am Department of Philosophy der Washington University in St. Louis. 1983 wurde er hier an die School of Law, und im Jahr 2000 zum William Gardiner Hammond Professor of Law berufen. Professor Paulson wurde 2004 die Ehrendoktorwürde von der Universität Uppsala in Schweden und der Universität zu Kiel verliehen. Neben Fellowships u.a. des National Endowment for the Humanities, der Fulbright Commision, der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft und der Rockefeller Foundation erhielt Paulson 2003 den Forschungspreis der Alexander von Humbolt-Stiftung. Gegenwärtig bekleidet Paulson die Mercator Gastprofessor an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel.
    Der Schwerpunkt seiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit liegt in der europäischen Rechtsphilosophie und –theorie. Eine Vielzahl seiner Beiträge befassen sich mit der Rechtsphilosophie und Verfassungstheorie von Hans Kelsen. Paulson verfasst seine Arbeiten auf Deutsch und Englisch. Eine Reihe von ihnen wurde mittlerweile in viele weitere Sprachen übersetzt.

    Abstract:
    Um 1960 herum hat Hans Kelsen (1881-1973) sein ganzes kantisches bzw. neukantianisches Instrumentarium, auf dem seine Reine Rechtslehre beruht, aufgegeben. Er schrieb Ulrich Klug in einem Brief vom 4. Juli 1960, er könne seine Lehre von der mittelbaren oder analogen Anwendung der Logik auf das Recht nicht mehr aufrechterhalten. Zwei Jahre später, auf einer Tagung in Salzburg, verkündete er, seine Lehre von der Grundnorm nicht mehr vertreten zu können. In anderen zu dieser Zeit geschriebenen Aufsätzen findet man Vergleichbares. Damit mußte seine berühmte Reine Rechtslehre zusammenbrechen. Wie konnte es hierzu kommen? Es wird verschiedentlich behauptet, sein Aufenthalt in Amerika habe die entscheidende Rolle gespielt (im Mai 1940 verließ er zusammen mit seiner Frau Margarete die Schweiz). Doch die entscheidenden Entwicklungen, die schließlich zur Aufgabe des klassischen Kelsenschen Instrumentariums führten, vollzogen sich bereits lange vorher in Europa.


  18. Lawyers as Insincere Actors

    Prof. Lawrence Solan (Brooklyn Law School)

    Vortrag gehalten am 04.11.2010

    Zur Person:
    Nach seinem Bachelor-Abschluss an der Brandeis University erwarb Solan den Ph.D. in Linguistik an der University of Massachusetts sowie den J.D. an der Harvard Law School. Bevor Lawrence Solan 1996 an die Universität wechselte war er Partner in der Kanzlei Orans, Elsen and Lupert und zuvor Assistent von Richter Stewart Pollock am Supreme Court von New Jersey. Seit 2002 ist er Direktor des Center for the Study of Law, Language and Cognition an der Brooklyn Law School. Zwei Jahre darauf wurde er dort Don Forchelli Professor of Law. Im Jahr 2009 verlieh ihm das Wuhan Institute of Technology eine Honorarprofessur. Er war Visiting Professor an der Yale Law School sowie Gaststipendiat an der psychologischen Fakultät der Princeton University. Er war Präsident der International Association of Forensic Linguistics, ist Mitglied der International Academy of Law and Mental Health und Mitherausgeber des International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law. Gegenwärtig ist Lawrence Solan Visiting Fellow im Department of Psychology und Visiting Professor im Council of the Humanities and Linguistics an der Princeton University.

    Lawrence Solans wissenschaftliche Beiträge wurden in den führenden amerikanischen Zeitschriften veröffentlicht. Zu seinen wichtigsten bisher erschienenen Büchern zählen The Language of Judges (1993), mit dem er eine wegweisende Arbeit auf dem Gebiet der theoretischen Linguistik und juristischen Argumentation vorlegte, und Speaking of Crime: The Language of Criminal Justice (gemeinsam mit Peter Tiersma, 2005). Demnächst erscheint von ihm Under the Law: Statutes and Their Interpretation und in Mitherausgeberschaft mit Peter Tiersma The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law.

    Abstract:
    Lawyers are given license to suspend what philosophers have called sincerity conditions. We ordinarily take people as being sincere in their speech. They expect us to do so, just as we, when we speak, expect others to take us as being sincere. Lawyers, however, are given license to be insincere. They are trained to be simultaneously truthful and insincere. On the one hand, they are required to tell the truth in the context of legal proceedings. On the other, they are insincere in that they routinely structure their speech to lead others into drawing inferences that will serve the lawyer’s goals, whether or not those inferences reflect a fair assessment of facts or law. This paper looks at the distinction between lying and deception, and finds some moral distinction, but not enough to justify the conduct acceptable by the legal profession on moral grounds. The paper discusses aspects of our psychology that make us vulnerable to the kind of deception practiced by lawyers, and concludes by criticizing American legal education for not imbuing a sense of responsibility in young lawyers that should accompany the license to be insincere. While the article focuses on lawyers working in the American adversarial system, many of the observations and issues apply to lawyers working in other legal systems as well.


  19. Mechanical Brains and Responsible Choices

    Prof. Michael Moore (University of Illinois)

    Vortrag gehalten am 18.03.2010

    Michael Moore ist einer der prominentesten Vertreter der neueren amerikanischen Naturrechtslehre, die er um einen eigenständigen naturalistischen Ansatz bereichert hat. Seine Forschungen bewegen sich vornehmlich an der Schnittstelle zwischen Recht und Philosophie, aber auch anderer Nachbarwissenschaften wie der Psychologie und der Politikwissenschaft.

    Nach seinem Bachelor-Abschluss in Politikwissenschaften an der University of Oregon besuchte Moore die Harvard University und erwarb dort sowohl den J.D., als auch den S.J.D., letzteren mit einer Dissertation zum Thema Law and Psychiatry: Rethinking the Relationship (Cambridge University Press, 1984), in der er die oft divergierenden Krankheitskonzeptionen im Recht und der Psychiatrie untersucht. Nach Stationen in Berkeley, an der University of Southern California und an der Universität von Kansas wurde Michael Moore im Jahre 2002 auf den Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. Chair berufen, den ersten universitätsübergreifenden Lehrstuhl aller drei Illinoier Universitäten. Er gehört dort sowohl dem College of Law als auch dem College of Liberal Arts and Sciences an. Miochael Moore erhielt bereits mehrere namhafte Forschungsstipendien, u. a. in dem Law and Humanities Program der Harvard University und durch das Humanities Research Institute der University of California.

    Neben acht Büchern hat Michael Moore zahlreiche größere Beiträge verfasst, die in den führenden amerikanischen Zeitschriften veröffentlicht worden sind. Zu seinen wichtigsten Arbeiten gehört Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law (Oxford University Press, 1993), in dem Moore eine vereinigende Theorie der Handlung für das britische und das amerikanische Strafrecht entwickelte. Placing Blame, a General Theory of the Criminal Law (Oxford University Press, 1997) stellt einen der führenden modernen Beiträge zu den strafrechtlichen Vergeltungstheorien dar. Daneben treten grundlegende Abhandlungen zur Rechtsontologie und zur juristischen Methodenlehre, darunter Legal Reality: A Naturalist Approach to Legal Ontology (Law and Philosophy, Vol. 21, 2002, pp. 619-705) und A Natural Law Theory of Interpretation (Southern California Law Review, Vol. 58, 1985, pp. 277-398).

    Michael Moores jüngste Veröffentlichung ist Causation and Responsibility (Oxford University Press, 2009), worin er den juristischen Kausalitätsbegriff im Anschluss an neuere philosophische und wissenschaftstheoretische Kausalitätstheorien entfaltet. Eng verwandt damit ist auch das Thema seines Vortrags in Freiburg, der das Problem der rechtlichen und moralischen Verantwortung vor dem Hintergrund der aktuellen Forschung in den Neurowissenschaften behandelt. Dabei Moore die Frage, inwiefern sich die aktuelle Herausforderung von den Ergebnissen früherer psychologischer Ansätze, etwa bei Hobbes, Freud oder Skinner, unterscheidet.

Benutzerspezifische Werkzeuge